K-Lifestyle Wiki

Korean Clothes

Hanbok

The Korean people learned to use various fabrics, such as sambe (hemp), mosi (ramie), cotton and silk to make a range of clothing that was not only attractive but also provided them with effective protection even during the harshest winters and the hottest summers. They made warm winter clothes using the technique of filling soft cotton between two layers of material, silk or cotton fabric, and sewing them together with fine stitching, and produced cool summer clothes with hemp and ramie. These clothes typically feature graceful lines and forms that create the serene aura characteristic of the traditional Korean clothes we know as hanbok.
Korea’s indigenous clothing, hanbok, has maintained its basic components throughout Korea’s 5,000-year history, while its styles and forms have evolved in various ways based on the lifestyle, social conditions, and aesthetic taste of the times.
History reveals that Korean people in the past tended to prefer simple, white clothes to clothing decorated with different colors and designs. That is why they were often referred to as “the white-clad people” among their neighbors who admired them for being a peaceful people. Nonetheless, Korea has also had a long tradition of enjoying colorful clothes with complex designs depending on the period and the wearer’s social status.
Today, Korea is home to many talented fashion designers who have earned an international reputation with their creative designs which combine traditional Korean designs and patterns with a modern artistic sensibility. The beauty of traditional Korean clothes has been introduced to, and praised in, many parts of the world thanks to the remarkable success in recent years of many Korean films and TV dramas including Dae Jang Geum.
Korean people today seem to prefer clothes inspired by modern Western styles to their traditional clothes, although some people still insist on wearing the latter on traditional holidays or for special family occasions such as weddings. Their love of tradition and yearning for the new sometimes led to the creation of attractive “modernized hanbok.”

Source: Korean Culture and Information Service 'Facts about Korea'

Image source: Korea Open Government License

ReplyPlease leave a comment about any information you wanted to add!
RAGGIE LIBUTAN
3 months ago

The Foundation of Korean Fashion The word 한복 hanbok itself 🎐🎐actually means “Korean clothing”. It consists of two main pieces. On the upper body, both men and women wear a jacket called the 저고리 jeogori. ... The origins of the hanbok can be traced back to the Goguryeo Dynasty, one of the Three Ancient Kingdoms of Korea.🎎🎎🎎🎎🎎🎎🧧🧧

Lyudmila Romanov
3 months ago

I found an interesting image at the Pinterest so leave a link here for sharing. Check out the link! XD Goryeo Dynasty(AD918-1392) Korean clothes Hanbok: https://www.pinterest.co.kr/g_richh/goryeo-dynasty-korean-clothes/

Carl Ivan Setias
3 months ago

Gomusin Gomusin (Korean pronunciation: [komuɕʰin]) are shoes made of rubber in a form of Korean traditional shoes. The shoes are wide, with low heels. Gomusin for men were modeled after "gatsin" (갖신), and ones for women were danghye (당혜).

Carl Ivan Setias
3 months ago

The only surviving traditional hwahyejang in Korea today is Hwang Hae-bong, who operates a small workshop in Seoul. His family have been making shoes for five generations. Hwang learned the trade from his grandfather and is training his second son Hwang Deok-jin to continue in the profession. In 2004, at the age of sixty, Hwang was recognised by Korea's Cultural Heritage Association as an intangible cultural asset, following in the footsteps of his grandfather Hwang Han-gap, who was made a cultural asset in 1971.

Carl Ivan Setias
3 months ago

Hwahyejang (Korean: 화혜장) are craftsmen who construct traditional Korean footwear. The shoes are classified into hwa (shoes that go over the ankle) and hye (shoes that do not cover the ankle), hence the compound word "hwahyejang". Historically, the two distinct types of shoe were made by separate specialist craftsmen, the hyejang and the hwajang.

Carl Ivan Setias
3 months ago

It can take as much as a week to craft a single pair of shoes. The shoes are typically made from leather obtained from cows, pigs or sheep, although historically horsehide and deerskin were also used. Whereas Western shoes are shaped differently for left and right feet, Korean shoes are identical for both feet; the softness of the leather gradually conforms to the shape of the owner's foot. Some types have ribbons or laces that are knotted around the ankle to keep the shoe in place. Many are decorated with floral designs, and are sometimes covered with an ornamental silk upper.

Carl Ivan Setias
3 months ago

The basic form of the Korean shoe was developed during the Three Kingdoms era, although earlier forms date back to prehistoric times. During the early Joseon period as many as 30 professional shoemakers were employed at court. The shoemaking caste, however, was considered cheonmin, the lowest possible caste. At this time, shoes were an important indicator of a person's profession or social status, with designs, colours and styles varying depending on social caste or occupation. However, after the Gabo Reform of 1894, traditional leather shoes became less popular, and in the twentieth century were largely superseded by rubber gomusin.

Willy Liman
3 months ago

#Fact34 growing trend among visitors to Korea – many of whom have seen traditional Korean clothing in films and TV Dramas – is to rent a hanbok for the day and visit historical scenic spots for the perfect photo opportunities.

Willy Liman
3 months ago

#Fact33 Lately, in korea, there is a trend that some people wear modernized Hanbok. It isn’t fancy but easy to wear and made same as modern clothes.

Willy Liman
3 months ago

#Fact32 Korean people wear Hanbok occasionally. Only they wear it when their wedding ceremony and two biggest holidays in Korea like Chusuk(it is same as Thanks giving day) and Seol(Lunar new year’s day). Although it is easy to move and has many benefit like ventilation or heat reservance, modern society people prefer to wear daily clothes which most of world wide people wear. Even if these days it is hard to find to wear Hanbok, you can still try it at Korea culture center or tourist spot where you can experience traditional Korean culture.