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Language and Letters

Most linguists place Korean in the Altaic language family, though some consider it to be a language isolate, meaning that it cannot be simply related with any other language. The written form of Korean uses Hangeul, a writing system commissioned by King Sejong (1397-1450) during the Joseon Dynasty. Koreans are very proud of this remarkable achievement, and Hangeul is a very efficient and easy script to learn and use.
Hangeul is composed of fourteen consonants and ten vowels. It can express virtually all the sounds produced by nature and humans. Every year, UNESCO presents the King Sejong Literacy Prize to people who have made a distinguished contribution to the elimination of illiteracy. The inclusion of ‘King Sejong’ in the name of the prize may be said to be tacit recognition of his greatest accomplishment, the creation of Hangeul, which is easy to learn and use.

King Sejong the Great

Sejong was the fourth king of the Joseon Dynasty. He made many great accomplishments in the spheres of science, economy, defense, art and culture. One of his greatest accomplishments was the creation of Hangeul in 1443, an easy-to-learn, efficient, and scientific writing system. He is respected as one of the country’s greatest kings among Koreans.

Source: Korean Culture and Information Service 'Facts about Korea'

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Seul mi Bea
3 months ago

3 Establishment of "Sejonghakdang" With such demand, the South Korean government established the concept of "Sejonghakdang" so as to provide integrated and standardised information and service for learning the Korean language as well as to coordinate and expand the institutes where people can learn or teach it, The Sehonghakdang will be developed as the brand commonly used by all Korean language education institutes. The South Korean government has recently launched its homepage at http://www.sejonghakdang.org in Korean and English.

Seul mi Bea
3 months ago

2 Rising numbers of Korean learners The last twenty years has seen a rise in interest and demand for the Korean language due to cultural and commercial globalisation and the Internet/Communications Revolution. International interest in Korean culture such as dramas and music has increased tremendously, especially in Asia, leading to what has been termed the "Korean wave". Related to this there has also been an increase in foreign students studying in Korea. Demographically there has also been an increase in marriages between Koreans and foreigners. With the increase in international cooperation and business, the South Korean government has been striving to standardize the names of locations, people, and other proper nouns in Hangul. Also, there was a need for more up-to-date Korean dictionaries, as most were made during the 1990s.

Seul mi Bea
3 months ago

1 King Sejong Institute / Sejonghakdang (세종학당) Sejonghakdang (Hangul: 세종학당) is a brand name that the South Korean government launched in order to comprehensively provide Korean language learners and teachers with an integrated study and information service. "Sejonghakdang" is expected to be developed as the brand for Korean-learning or -teaching Institutes around the world. Sejong was the fourth King of the Joseon Dynasty of Korea who created the Korean alphabet in 1446 and Hakdang means educational institutes in Korean. Background Early Korean language teaching Hangul, the Korean alphabet, is the written form of the official Korean language and has been used by Koreans since its creation in 1446 by Sejong the Great of the Joseon Dynasty. Most Korean language learning institutions outside Korea targeted second or third generation descendants of Korean immigrants, while Korean-language learners in South Korea were mostly foreign students, migrant workers, or spouses of Koreans.

Aruna Garg
3 months ago

In my opinion Korean Language is very easy to learn but the vocabulary part is really difficult 🙈🙈😄

buenaventura libutan
3 months ago

The Korean language is spoken mainly in North and South Korea. It is spoken by more than 78 million people (most are North or South Koreans). In South Korea, it is called hangukmal (한국말) or hangugeo (Hangeul: 한국어, Hanja: 韓國語)

Dwi Cahyani
3 months ago

I really want to learn Korean language. Please make a segment where we can learn

Willy Liman
3 months ago

#Fact15 Koreans often say “our” or “we” instead of “my” or “me.” In situations where an English speaker would say “my” or “me,” Koreans often use “our” or “we” instead.  This practice is rooted in Confucian traditions and communal values.

Willy Liman
3 months ago

#Fact14 In Korean culture, formality, politeness and status is still a big deal. So, special nouns and verb endings show respect to both the person you’re talking to and the person your talking about. This is one of the reasons businesses need a skilled translator for Korean translation. If you want to have the desired impact on your audience,  it’s important to get these nuances right.

Willy Liman
3 months ago

#Fact13 Koreans love their alphabet so much, both North and South Korea honor it with a national holiday (October 9th in the South and January 15th in the North). Because the Korean alphabet is so different from the Latin alphabet, documents may need to be reformatted when they are translated from one language to another. Text often contracts horizontally when translated from English to Korean, but requires more space vertically.

Willy Liman
3 months ago

#Fact12 Hangul may be one of the youngest alphabets in the world, but it’s also the most well-designed. To quote Wikipedia, “[n]umerous linguists have praised Hangul for its featural design, describing it as “remarkable”, “the most perfect phonetic system devised”, and “brilliant, so deliberately does it fit the language like a glove.” Another cool fact: In Hangul, the shape of the letters mimics what your tongue is doing when you pronounce them.