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Representative Attraction

Korean Demilitarized Zone

The cessation of the Korean War in 1953, following the signing of the Korean Armistice Agreement, led to the creation of the Military Demarcation Line (MDL) and the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), which is 250km long and approximately 4km wide, i.e., 2km on the South’s side and another 2km on the North’s. On the western part of the DMZ, there is a farming village called Daeseongdong, better known as “Freedom Village” among South Koreans.
Civilian access to the DMZ is normally restricted but allowed for those who receive a permit issued by the military. The same applies to foreign tourists. The prohibition of public access to the DMZ for the last 60 years has helped maintain the environment in pristine condition, a quality for which in recent times it has attracted the interest of scientists and conservationists the world over.

Bukchon Hanok Village, Jeonju Hanok Village

The recent revival of interest in modernized traditional Korean houses (called hanok) among architectural designers and house buyers from across Korea has also helped attract numerous tourists to Korea’s old villages and districts where they can experience the traditional Korean lifestyle in an authentic environment. Two of the most popular destinations for enthusiasts are Bukchon Hanok Village in Seoul and Jeonju Hanok Village in Jeonju.
Bukchon Hanok Village in Seoul refers to a residential area located north of the Jongno and Cheonggyecheon Stream area in downtown Seoul—hence the name—once occupied by wealthy aristocratic families during the Joseon Period. The area has become one of Seoul’s main tourist attractions, largely because of the old-world atmosphere and the well-preserved traditional houses and the narrow winding alleys linking them. Flanked by the two main Royal Palaces of Joseon, Gyeongbokgung, and Changdeokgung, with Inwangsan and Bukhansan Mountains rising directly behind them, and modern skyscrapers in the south, the district exhibits a unique harmony between Seoul’s present and past.
The largest Hanok district in Korea and one of the most popular tourist destinations among visitors is that in Jeonju. The Jeonju Hanok Village consists of about 700 traditional tile-roofed houses, some of which have been turned into guesthouses, restaurants, teahouses, and workshops, providing visitors with opportunities to experience the local cultural heritage. The district also contains some of the city’s most important heritage sites, such as Gyeonggijeon Shrine, which houses the official portrait of King Taejo, founder of the Joseon Dynasty, a local Confucian school (hyanggyo), and Omokdae Terrace, which commands a great view of the entire district.
There are but a few mansion houses dating from the Joseon Period across Korea, of which Seongyojang in Gangneung is particularly famous for its exquisite, fully preserved 300-year-old buildings and well-tended traditional garden. Built by a minor member of Joseon royalty and still used as a dwelling house by one of his descendants, Seongyojang is regarded as a fine example of a dwelling of the wealthy ruling class of Joseon. It also consists of rooms such as an inner quarter (anchae) for women, detached outer quarter (sarangchae) for guest receptions, servants’ quarter (haengnangchae) for servants, and separate rooms (byeoldang), as well as an artificial pond at the entrance and a pavilion called Hwallaejeong.

Local Festivals

As in many other parts of the world, local communities in Korea have developed a variety of cultural programs and events to mark their achievements or to celebrate the cultural and natural heritage bequeathed to them. In Boryeong in Chungcheongnam-do Province, for instance, the local mud festival attracts summer holidaymakers from all over Korea and from overseas, while in Andong of Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, the annual international mask dance festival entertains tourists visiting the city. The Hwacheon Sancheoneo Ice Festival held annually in January is one of the biggest winter festivals.
Other popular festivals include the Gimje Horizon Festival, which is focused on the local agricultural heritage preserved in Gimje, Jeollabuk-do Province, the Jeonju Hanji Culture Festival, and the Jeonju Bibimbap Festival, which is held to celebrate the heritage that has helped the city of Jeonju gain an international reputation. In Jinju of Gyeongsangnam-do Province, the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Festival has begun to serve a similar function. Held to commemorate the ordinary people of Jinju, who fought heroically to protect their hometown against invading Japanese forces during the Imjin Waeran (Japanese Invasion of 1592) at the turn of the 16th century, the festival provides tourists with fantastic nighttime views of lanterns floating along the Namgang River. In Chuncheon, Gangwon-do Province, the Chuncheon International Mime Festival (CIMF) offers an exciting range of performances presented by ‘mime theater’ companies gathered for the event from across the world.

Source: Korean Culture and Information Service 'Facts about Korea'

ReplyPlease leave a comment about any information you wanted to add!
RAGGIE LIBUTAN
3 months ago

🏯🏯⛩⛩🇰🇷💖💖💖A hanok (Korean: 한옥, 韓屋) is a traditional Korean house. Hanoks were first designed and built in the 14th century during the Joseon Dynasty. Korean architecture considers the positioning of the house in relation to its surroundings, with thought given to the land and seasons🏯🏯🏯🇰🇷🇰🇷

RAGGIE LIBUTAN
3 months ago

🏯🏯🏯🇰🇷🇰🇷⛩⛩Bukchon Hanok Village is a Korean traditional village in Seoul with a long history located on the top of a hill between Gyeongbok Palace, Changdeok Palace and Jongmyo Royal Shrine. The traditional village is composed of many alleys, hanok and is preserved to show a 600-year-old urban environment🏯🏯🏯🏯🏯

Willy Liman
3 months ago

You can also see tanks and war crafts used during the war. How cool!There’s even an amusement park near the Nuri Peace Park (you can reach it within 5~10 minutes on foot) where you and your whole family will have plenty of fun as well. Built in 1972, this three-storied building is called Imjingak, which is surrounded by several monuments, Unification Park and North Korea Center. Inside the building, you can see exhibitions and collections of various relics and monuments related to the Korean War and subsequent South-North confrontations.In front of Imjingak, you can find this old train that used to take passengers to the northern end of the Korean Peninsula before the two Koreas divided

Willy Liman
3 months ago

What can I see during the DMZ Tour? Usually, the DMZ Tour starts off or ends at the venue called Imjingak Resort and Nuri Peace Park, an hour and a half drive away from Seoul. Located 7 km from the Military Demarcation Line (MDL), the land border between North Korea and South Korea, this area is open to foreigners and locals to visit without going through any security checkpoints. Today, Nuri Peace Park is a great place for couples, friends, and family to spend time and relax. This beautifully decorated area with artistic sculptures holds performances time to time.

Willy Liman
3 months ago

What should I bring when visiting DMZ? All visitors, both locals and foreign visitors alike, must bring an ID card, a passport, or other types of documentation (Application Registration Card (ARC) for example) for identity check purposes on the day of the tour.

Alex Fong
3 months ago

What makes Seoul one of a kind? I believe its Hangang/ Han River. The city is basically build around the river and has a rich history of how the city came about. However the attractions along the Han River is also unique. You can go to the river to ride a bike riverside, go to the park and jog, set a nice picnic and eat chicken and beer or simply gaze at the sunset over the water. Or even take a boat on the river. There are a variety of things to do near the Han River and it is truly one of the main and underrated attractions of Seoul.

Harriet Wilson
3 months ago

In my opinion, Jeonju, Gyeongju, Andong and Jeju are the cities where you can discover Korean sentiment and culture the most

Alselin Adiba
3 months ago

Located 60 kilometers from Seoul and 210 kilometers from Pyongyang, the Joint Security Zone (JSA) in Panmunjom is a zone of 800 meters by 400 meters. On each side of the Military Demilitarized Line (MDL), the two Koreas have their own liaison offices and conference rooms. This includes the House of Peace where South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un will meet. Under a separate 1953 agreement, the United Nations (UN) command and the North Korean military were allowed to send no more than 35 troops to the JSA. Only one handgun or non-automatic rifle may each be carried.

Alselin Adiba
3 months ago

For the first time ever, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un crossed the DMZ military demarcation line to meet with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, at Panmunjom Village, known as the Village of Armistice, because that's where the agreement to end the Korean War was signed on 27 July 1953. Peace Village, Panmunjom is a complex of bright light blue buildings with a dark history of the conflict between South and North Korea's neighbors.

Alselin Adiba
3 months ago

The Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), one of the world's most dire frontiers, is full of weapons, arteries, mines and a host of deterrents so that none of the North Koreans cross into the survivors of South Korea. The four kilometer-wide border buffer zone between North and South Korea will become a world spotlight, coinciding with the holding of the historic Inter-Korea Summit (Summit).